Pride and Prejudice: Mr Darcy’s First Proposal


Burn, Darcy. Burn!

So we finally covered Mr Darcy’s proposal in English Literature class and let’s just say that as the teacher read the passage, I was mouthing the words and hearing in my mind the swoon-worthy tone of Matthew Macfadyen. I am aware that there are other Mr Darcys out there, though I know the 2004 movie adaptation is far from being the most accurate to the novel, I still think Macfadyen wins as the ‘top Darcy’ simply because of his voice.

Oh, and the passion between their characters! It’s just so… ohmigoshsogreat, y’know?? It completely takes my breath away. And then I thought about my third* favourite Darcy, and how Colin Firth managed to make you feel sorry for him even though he insults Elizabeth so thoroughly. In the 1996 television version, I absolutely love the proposal scene because not only does it stay true to the novel, but Ehle’s coldness was how I imagined Elizabeth to react.

Though Keira Knightley was great and everything, I felt the scene was dramatised too much. I mean, c’mon! The prophetic fallacy? The raining? It get’s old, man. Besides, Ehle’s Elizabeth was strong, and she didn’t nearly kiss Darcy in the heat of passion… unlike Knightley. ^_^

Moving on to the other interpretations of Darcy’s proposal, I came across the 1940s film Continue reading

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Never Let Me Go (2010)


It’s a small world after all! I’ve found another movie with two actresses I know have worked together before in another film! Isn’t that exciting?

Yes, I know that compared to America, Britain only has a handful of actors and actresses that are good enough for serious dramas such as Never Let Me Go, and I know that actors and actresses tend to be ‘recycled’. Not that I mind, since I like watching a wide variety of movies of my favorite actors. And I also like spotting the connections — I’ve made it into a game, actually, to find as many links as possible… such as:

  • Carey Mulligan and Keira Knightley worked together in the more recent remake of Pride and Prejudice
  • This isn’t the first movie that Mulligan has worked with one of her ‘Bennet sisters’; she starred in An Education with Rosamund Pike
  • I didn’t know this, but Andrew Garfield was in The Social Network. I bought the movie because I love Facebook, but I didn’t know that Garfield was in it, too

Never Let Me Go, before it was made into a movie, is a novel based on the sci-fi idea that cloning is possible (in humans, at least). The main gist of the story is that the main characters Kathy, Tommy and Ruth, along with the other students in Hailsham boarding school and various other institutions, are clones whose main purpose in life was to provide donor organs for their Originals, the people they were cloned from.

It’s much better explained by this quote from the movie:

None of you will go to America. None of you will work in supermarkets. None of you will do anything, except live the life that has already been set out for you. You will become adults, but only briefly. Before you are old, before you are even middle aged, you will start to donate your vital organs. And sometime around your third or fourth donation, your short life will be completed.

It’s all very inhumane and my respect for my fellow humans lessened at the little bit of truth in this. I mean, they’re just kids!

The idea of clones wasn’t mentioned outright in the movie, only alluded to, which contributed to my confusion for the better part of the film. Anyway, watching it was very intense, and I feel like if I had watched it without the distraction that a busy household provides, then perhaps I would’ve cried.

Andrew Garfield was spectacular in capturing the “sensory” and “animalistic” side of him.

Carey Mulligan’s sultry voice was wonderful during the narration.

And let’s not forget Keira, who, despite my paying too much attention to her lower jaw, played Ruth very well. Her character is the one I identify with the most.

The movie is a must-watch. I recommend this to those who can put up with the slow unravelling of the plot. The love between Kathy and Tommy is admirable, though I feel like Tommy’s too focused on his mortality for it to be real for me. This movie has a lot of truth in it, and it really would make you cry.

Watch the trailer here:

Pride and Prejudice


Elizabeth Bennet, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Charles Bingley, Caroline Bingley, Jane Bennet… oh, those characters we all know and love. (Yes, even Caroline.)

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”

It’s been ages since I’ve read the book — in 2007, to be precise, and even then I was so young I barely understood what was happening because of  the hard words and the relatively new (in an old way) sentence structure. I only read it because a classmate of mine recommended the story to me. She was talking about the movie, of course, but since I didn’t have a copy then, I went straight to the library to get the copy of the book.

I’ve seen the movie, of course. And by movie I mean the one with Keira Knightley as the witty Miss Eliza Bennet. It was only recently that I’ve come across a DVD copy of the television series… you know, the one with Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy?

(Oh, Mr. Darcy!)

Ahem.

Anyhow, having seen the two different interpretations of Jane Austen‘s wonderful work, I’ve come to the conclusion that one: Matthew Macfadyen’s version of the proposal was much better, what with his deep, swoon-able voice working for him; and two: Colin Firth’s lake scene was certainly blush worthy. Now I know what the fuss was all about! =P

Certainly both interpretations were wonderful in their own right. The television series had more time, so it was the most accurate with the book. Yet, the movie was comical and Mrs. Bennet was less annoying. Yes, yes, I know. Mrs. Bennet is supposed to be annoying. But she irks me, all right? I just couldn’t stand it.

Now, I’m off to watch Macfadyen read Pride and Prejudice. Wanna watch it with me? Just go here.